An easier way to master Lithuanian declension

Sunday, January 24, 2010

This method would work with other heavily declined languages as well. The thought occurred to me the other day that when explaining declension in Lithuanian, there really is no need to explain it using sentences that are written completely in Lithuanian, as this may tend to confuse the learner who is forced to take everything on in one go (verb conjugation, unfamiliar words, declension, different word order, everything). So when teaching declension why not just write out sentences almost entirely in English (or whatever the mother tongue of the student happens to be), with only the words being used to show declension in Lithuanian?

To demonstrate this, I've taken each of the words in the Lithuanian declension page from Wikipedia used to show how all five declensions work, and have created a short story or conversation using each and every form in both singular and plural, at least once. I've also done my best to make them as memorable as possible, as imparting the information in a specific story may make it easier to retain than just one dry sentence after another.

I've just finished writing it out so there may still be a typo or two, and hopefully lyzazel will take a look at it. Also note that this is more of a memorization exercise than a perfect demonstration of cases in Lithuanian, so not all instances will match up to their Lithuanian equivalents.

The next "level" after this would be declination of adjectives as well, but adjectives are much easier so the stories for those shouldn't take very long to create.



vaikas = child

singular plural
Nominative vaikas vaikai
Genitive vaiko vaikų
Dative vaikui vaikams
Accusative vaiką vaikus
Instrumental vaiku vaikais
Locative vaike vaikuose
Vocative vaike vaikai



Into the room walked a vaikas. This was the third vaikas because there were already two vaikai on the other side of the room. The vaiko face looked worried, while the other two vaikų faces looked quite calm at first. On the one vaike was very little money, while on the two vaikuose in the room there was quite a bit; they were from a rich family. The two vaikai called to the one vaikui. "Vaike, what are you doing here?" The one vaikas responded to the two vaikams: "Vaikai, I am here because your father sent me." What? The two vaikų father sent a new vaiką to join them? Did he not love the two vaikus he already had? What was he attempting to do with this vaiku? The new vaikas thought to himself: "Use them, vaike. You may not like them but with these vaikais and their family you may be able to accomplish great things..."


brolis = brother

singular plural
Nominative brolis broliai
Genitive brolio brol
Dative broliui broliams
Accusative brolį brolius
Instrumental broliu broliais
Locative brolyje broliuose
Vocative broli broliai


Once upon a time there were three broliai. The middle brolis said to the eldest broliui: "Broli, I am bored of our life here in this small village. Let us set out to the city to see what opportunity awaits us." The eldest brolio face lit up as he had always wanted to make a name for himself. But the youngest brolis said to them, "Broliai, I still have one year left of school here. Let us wait just a bit longer." The other two brolių faces showed disappointment but they knew their little brolis was right. On the eldest brolyje was a sword, and he went out back to practice it some more for when the time came. Meanwhile, on the two younger and weaker broliuose were books, and they took them out to study by the firelight in the house. But while they had a year to wait, to all three broliams came a kind of hope. It was very likely that next year someone would hire the eldest brolį to become a soldier, and certainly someone would hire the two younger and intelligent brolius as scribes. In the beginning they would probably need to use the eldest broliu to pay the bills, but eventually they would all become three great broliais.


arklys = horse

singular plural
Nominative arklys arkliai
Genitive arklio arkl
Dative arkliui arkliams
Accusative arklį arklius
Instrumental arkliu arkliais
Locative arklyje arkliuose
Vocative arkly arkliai

A: "What's your favourite animal?"
B: "Well, I'm not sure but I think I like that arklį over there."
A: "That one? In general arkliai usually like humans, but that one arklys doesn't like people at all."
B: "But I used to have two arklius back home that looked like that one and they were both very nice. Here, let me try calling him. Arkly! ...."
A: "Told you, he doesn't like people. With that arkliu you won't even get over that ridge, let alone the next town."
B: "Well, have you even tried sitting on the arklyje? That arklio body looks like it was made for people to ride."
A: "I don't know. It looks to me like pretty much all arkl bodies are made for that. You might know arklius better than I do."
B: "I think I do. I used to give carrots to my two arkliams back home. My guess is that this arklys likes them. Here, let's try giving this arkliui a carrot or two."
A: "So how far did you ride before using your two arkliais?"
B: "Pretty far. I would always have a big saddle with lots of equipment on my two arkliuose, and they enjoyed the ride. I would even take them together with a friend of mine sometimes. Just tell them arkliai, to the city! and off they'd go."


motina = mother

singular plural
Nominative motina motinos
Genitive motinos motinų
Dative motinai motinoms
Accusative motiną motinas
Instrumental motina motinomis
Locative motinoje motinose
Vocative motina motinos


There are many types of motinos in the animal kingdom, and indeed the human motina is actually quite similar to them. On the human motinoje is the same instrument for producing milk that one finds on other motinose among mammals. It's true that other mammals get stronger quickly by means of their motinomis, but a human baby will still develop quite a bit over time relying on its motina too. Of course, there are also large differences. The human motinos body is only made to have a single baby every few years, while the bodies of cat motinų are capable of giving birth to many kittens at a time. Also, I'm not sure if my kitten remembers his motiną or not, but humans continue to talk with and see their motinas even after they grow up. My friend still says "motina!" whenever he sees his motiną. And so to the human motinai and all the motinoms in the animal kingdom we say to them "Motinos, good job!"



katė = cat

singular plural
Nominative katė katės
Genitive katės kač
Dative katei katėms
Accusative katę kates
Instrumental kate katėmis
Locative katėje katėse
Vocative kate katės

A: "Look, there's a katė on the street! Let's call it and see if it comes over."
B: "Here kate kate kate..."
A: "No luck, he ran away. I hear there are a lot of katės in this neighborhood."
B: "There are. My sister always gives food to all the katėms that live here, and sometimes pets those kates too."
A: "Yeah, I was hoping we could pet that katę too."
B: "Well, it takes time. A katės personality isn't like that of a dog. You can't just go to where there's a group of katės and say "Hey katės!" and expect them to come over.
A: "So what about the kittens of these kač?"
B: "Their mothers usually take care of them. I gave some food to a katei on the street the other day and it turned out that she was the mother and carried the food all the way back to them."
A: "I saw a katę the other day on the street - on that katėje was a moustache that made it look like Hitler."
B: "You should have taken a picture. If there is a moustache on those katėse they're called "Kitlers" and with those katėmis you can get pretty famous online if it's funny enough."
A: "Note to self - take picture of katę, use kate to get famous..."



pati = wife

singular plural
Nominative pati pačios
Genitive pačios pačių
Dative pačiai pačioms
Accusative pačią pačias
Instrumental pačia pačiomis
Locative pačioje pačiose
Vocative pati (or pačia) pačios

In that house there is a husband and pati, newly married. It's not just your average couple though, because the pačios husband is overly attached to her, and another man secretly loves his pač. On the pačioje is a wedding ring that she wears out of obligation, as opposed to on other pačiose who wear their wedding rings out of love and joy. She became a pačia a few years back, around the same time that most of her other friends became pačiomis too. Those pač husbands are generally pretty average people, and they are fairly happy pačios. When those husbands proposed and gave rings to their pačioms they were very happy, while when this husband gave his ring to his pačiai she was secretly unhappy but accepted it nevertheless out of pity. This couple sees the other husbands and pačias on the weekend sometimes, though this pati would rather spend the weekend alone. After the couples return home the husbands say "pati (or pačia), did you have a good time?" and the answer is usually yes. But the one pačios answer is often no. The lesson here: pačios, be careful about making such decisions lightly!



vagis = thief (masculine)

singular plural
Nominative vagis vagys
Genitive vagies vag
Dative vagiui vagims
Accusative vagį vagis
Instrumental vagimi vagimis
Locative vagyje vagyse
Vocative vagie vagys



Vagys are very popular in role-playing games. Using a vagimi a team of players can get into areas they never could before without him. On your average vagyje is a set of lock-picking tools, and on many other vagyse are tools that let them disguise themselves as completely different people. A vagies personality is also very interesting, as they are less altruistic than other characters. The moral character of these vag can even be slanted towards evil. Using these vagimis in an adventure is also very exciting - you never know when you are going to hear "Hey, vagie, stop! Somebody catch that vagį!" If there is a vagis in a bar and you want to approach that vagiui to join your team, it's best to think of what you have that the vagis would want. It's also good to remember that too many vagys can be a bad thing. In full out combat it's easy for monsters to injure those vagis as they are individually quite weak, and if you are a group of vagys you're going to always have officials telling their guards "Go to those vagims and arrest them all; they're criminals so we'll take them out in one fell swoop." You certainly don't want an adventure to end with the words "Vagys, for the good of the state I hereby sentence you to death!"



akis = eye (feminine)

singular plural
Nominative akis akys
Genitive akies ak
Dative akiai akims
Accusative akį akis
Instrumental akimi akimis
Locative akyje akyse
Vocative akie akys



A: "You know what's interesting? My akies colour is a kind of weird green."
B: "Don't you mean your ak colour? You have more than one akį, you know."
A: "Oh yeah. I was just reading about the Cyclops in Greek mythology so maybe that's what did it. The Cyclops did pretty well just using one akimi."
B: "Sure, and many other animals use more than two akimis as well so they would look at our two akis and think them to be pretty weird. Exactly the same way that we look at the one akį of the Cyclops and wonder how he lived with that."
A: "The akis is pretty varied when you think about it. The akys of birds are capable of seeing ultraviolet as well.
B: "And even on your average akyje you don't even find the same components either. On the akyse of insects you find a weird kind of honeycomb-type shape."
A: "Yeah, those akys are pretty weird. Well, to my akims they look weird, that is."
B: "And to the akiai of the Cyclops your akys look weird too."
A: "I suppose so. I wish I could use other akis sometimes. I'd look at one of them and say "Akie, come here! Time to try you out.""
B: "Talking to inanimate objects already I see. I bet when you get older you'll say things like "Akys, don't fail me now!" when you're alone."



sūnus = son

singular plural
Nominative sūnus sūnūs
Genitive sūnaus sūnų
Dative sūnui sūnums
Accusative sūnų sūnus
Instrumental sūnumi sūnumis
Locative sūnuje sūnuose
Vocative sūnau sūnūs


Sūnūs play an important role in mythology, history and popular culture. Alexander the Great's father once famously said to his sūnui: "Sūnau, ask for thyself another kingdom, for that which I leave is too small for thee." There is of course also the story of the prodigal sūnus from the Bible. Daedalus had a sūnų named Icarus, and on his sūnuje were the wings of feathers and wax he used to try to escape but flew too close to the sun. His sūnaus ambition was too great and he ended up perishing in the ocean. Worf in Star Trek: the Next Generation is one of two sūnūs of Mogh. Mogh's sūnų goal was to regain their family honour. Though Mogh perished honorably in battle, he was accused of being a traitor after death and he surely would have liked to say to his sūnums: "Sūnūs, I did not betray the two of you; I died defending the Empire." if he could. Eventually though they were able to expose the plot that made their father look like a traitor and they became sūnumis with honour again. Romulus and Remus from Roman mythology are also interesting. The river deity Tiberinus took these two sūnus and kept them safe. Some say that later on one day there was a shovel on the first sūnuje Romulus, with which he killed his brother and became the sūnumi for which the city was named. Other accounts say though that Romulus didn't kill his brother and that in these two sūnuose was only love for each other.


profesorius = professor

singular plural
Nominative profesorius profesoriai
Genitive profesoriaus profesor
Dative profesoriui profesoriams
Accusative profesor profesorius
Instrumental profesoriumi profesoriais
Locative profesoriuje profesoriuose
Vocative profesoriau profesoriai



"Profesoriau, come in." said Sherlock Holmes. In walked the profesorius, who seemed quite nervous at being in the presence of the legendary detective. On the profesoriuje was a gold pocket watch, which Holmes expertly noted as he intently watched the profesor. Nervous, he began to speak. "I became a profesoriumi just five years ago, and am thus still new and do not know the other eight profesorius I work with as well as I should, though I engage in research daily with those those profesoriais. It really is quite the closed society and one cannot simply say "profesoriai, I am one of your circle now and should be privy to your secrets" just by having the same academic degree. In fact, on those profesoriuose is a certain seal that they own but I do not, and I have never been able to ascertain what sort of meaning it has to those profesoriams. I did approach one profesoriui one day to ask, but he pretended as if I had never asked in the first place." There was silence, and finally Holmes spoke. "Nine profesoriai in one faculty, very interesting. There is a reason why they did not speak to you of the matter - those profesor group is one only known to a few and never has more than eight members. But we can discern something about the group nevertheless. Tell me about the profesoriaus countenance at the time, the one you dared to ask about the group that day..."


vanduo = water

singular plural
Nominative vanduo vandenys
Genitive vandens vandenų
Dative vandeniui vandenims
Accusative vandenį vandenis
Instrumental vandeniu vandenimis
Locative vandenyje vandenyse
Vocative vandenie vandenys

Vanduo is common in most places on Earth, and humans as well as animals usually need to drink vandenį every day. There are many types of vandenys, and using these various types of vandenimis - for example vandeniu from the sea, or vandeniu from rivers, humans can do more than just drink. Humans take these vandenis and use them for scientific research as well. For these vandenims one needs a type of self-sustaining ecosystem, otherwise it would all disappear. For the vandeniui in a river for example you need a mountain to provide a source. In these various vandenyse you can find humans doing different things, like bathing or exploring or even using those vandenų features as weapons of war. In the fantasy desert world of Dark Sun, certain priests even worship these vandenis, saying things like "O vandenys of the past, please return and restore the green age that once was! I ask you to come forth now, rain vandenie!" Vandens appearance to the people of that world is a very welcome one, as they do not even have enough of it to bathe in vandenyje as people from other worlds can.


sesuo = sister

singular plural
Nominative sesuo seserys
Genitive sesers seserų
Dative seseriai seserims
Accusative seserį seseris
Instrumental seserimi seserimis
Locative seseryje seseryse
Vocative seserie seserys

A: "So I heard you're the only boy in the house and have two seseris."
B: "That's right. The first sesuo of mine was born before me, and two years after I was born we had the second so there are two seserys in total."
A: "What is your first sesers personality like?"
B: "She's pretty responsible and feels almost like a mom so I don't even call her by her name, just seserie."
A: "And is the personality of both seserų the same?"
B: "No, she's completely different. I watch my second seserį and think just how little she resembles the first."
A: "Do you talk to your seserims a lot?"
B: "Sure, but I talk to my second seseriai more. She's become a really nice seserimi to me. Well, both of them have become nice seserimis of course, but the second is easier to talk to."
A: "I noticed a new ring on your first seseryje the other day."
B: "Yeah, I've seen a lot of jewelry on both my seseryse fairly recently. I think they both have boyfriends or are just trying to show off. I sometimes ask them "Hey seserys, what's up with all the jewelry?" but they never tell me of course. My seserys are pretty secretive."


duktė = daughter

singular plural
Nominative duktė dukterys
Genitive dukters dukterų
Dative dukteriai dukterims
Accusative dukterį dukteris
Instrumental dukterimi dukterimis
Locative dukteryje dukteryse
Vocative dukterie dukterys



There are a lot of dukterys of famous and powerful people throughout the world. The president of Uzbekistan has a dukterį that is quite powerful and is often said to be interested in running the country after his death. Chelsea Clinton is the duktė of Bill and Hillary Clinton, and she became a much more well-known dukterimi during the election campaign in 2008. On these dukteryse is often found a type of dilemma where they have to balance being so famous with trying to live a normal life. A dukters personality is largely shaped by the culture in which she grows up. Many countries still try to avoid having dukteris, and this often results in these dukterys becoming dukterimis that work extra hard to impress their family. These dukterų ambitions often know no bounds, and this ambition is especially found in the dukteryje of a family with no other children, as this child wants to become a dukterimi that the whole family can be proud of. To these dukterims I say "Dukterys, you are absolutely correct!" It is actually a blessing in disguise for a dukteriai like this to be given such responsibility, as it is far better than a life without ambition. So do not despair, dukterie, your life is what you make it.

8 comments:

Paul D. said...

I'm amazed at how much some of those declensions resemble ancient Greek declensions.

Anonymous said...

nice idea!

lyzazel said...

PART 1 A nice idea. Writing these texts might have a few problems but that doesn't mean these problems cannot be worked out.

The biggest one I see is that the text doesn't make sense in a few places if you are Lithuanian. That is because we sometimes do not use the same cases for the same nouns. For example, "I want a house" is actually "I want a house (genitive)" or aš noriu namo (I want namo), while you would use the accusative normally if you were just trying to write it out of English (aš noriu namą; I want namą) and it would be incorrect. It's a bit confusing.

Another one is that sometimes it is confusing whether a case used belongs to the preposition or to the verb. For example:
"I used to give carrots to my two arkliams back home." - "Aš duodavau morkas savo dviems arkliams namuose"- there is no "to" in Lithuanian so the dative actually stands instead of it
"With that arkliu" - "su tuo arkliu" - now there is "su" in both English and Lithuanian and you have the instrumental case because "su" requires that. The thing is, if you do not know the prepositions in Lithuanian, you won't be able to tell if one exists or not so you will get confused. However, if you know the prepositions, why not use them and say "su that arkliu" (or maybe even "su tuo arkliu" at once in the English sentence as well?
Another suggestion: the other sentence could also be - "I used to give carrots my two arkliams back home." ("ams" actually plays the role of "to" so having both renders the phrase illogical.

Because of that, I'm not really sure how to correct this. I'll try correcting some of the ambiguous ones that don't sound right but I might miss some.

On the one vaike was very little money, while on the two vaikuose in the room there was quite a bit; - that doesn't quite make sense if you are Lithuanian, we say "tas vienas vaikas turėjo labai mažai pinigų, o tie du vaikai turėjo gana daug" or something like that while the declensions for the locative are good.

Did he not love the two vaikus he already had? - Should be "Ar jis nemylėjo tų dviejų vaikų, kuriuos jis jau turėjo". (It requires the genitive because there is "ne" in the sentence, and "ne" hates the nominative, remember?)... If you use the accusative (which we do not in Lithuanian), you are all good. If the learner doesn't know that, it's a bit hard. You could remove this phrase altogether or change it somehow.

On the eldest brolyje was a sword, and he went out back to practice it some more for when the time came. Meanwhile, on the two younger and weaker broliuose - I still quite don't get this construction ("on (in something) is another thing" means "something has another thing" ?)

In the beginning they would probably need to use the eldest broliu to pay the bills ->naudoti - brolį, pasinaudoti - broliu (both are possible and translate to roughly the same thing)


but eventually they would all become three great broliais. -> okay, Lithuanians are not sure themselves about this but I think the general consesus is "broliai" (and it is easier too; I am not sure exactly though...)

B: "Well, have you even tried sitting on the arklyje? - on the arklyje doesn't work, arklyje means "inside of the horse"... we would say "on arklio"... "ant arklio"

using your two arkliais?" - the phrase would be "su savo dviem arkliais" and Lithuanians would usually imply "su" so it would be "savo dviem arkliais"... however, you don't really say "using" because "naudodamasis savo dviem arkliais" although gramaticaly correct, sound very weird (just thought I'd point out)

lyzazel said...

PART 2

Pretty far. I would always have a big saddle with lots of equipment on my two arkliuose, - huh?

There are many types of motinos - daug motinų rūšių (motina does not work well for "animal" mothers but whatever)

On the human motinoje - same "huh"?

on other motinose - too

are a lot of katės - daug kačių

kittens of these kačių? - tų kačių kačiukai, maybe" these kačių kittens" would be better

on that katėje - again

on those katėse - and again

Note to self - take picture of katę, use kate to get famous..." - Pastaba sau: padaryk katės nuotrauką, panaudok katę (arba: pasinaudok kate), kad išpopuliarėtum

pati = wife (wife is actually žmona and 'pati' is extremely weird)

On the pačioje - one more time, the strange construction

to on other pačiose - the strange construction

and on his sūnuje were the wings - strange

ation is one of two sūnūs - vienas iš dviejų sūnų

there was a shovel on the first sūnuje Romulus,

On the profesoriuje .

know the other ten profesorius - dešimt profesorių (changes because it's dešimt... nominative: vienas profesorius, du profesoriai, trys profesoriai, keturi profesoriai, penki profesoriai... devyni profesoriai, dešimt profesorių, vienuolika profesorių, dvylika profesorių... devyniolika profesorių dvidešimt profesorių dvidešimt vienas profesorius dvidešimt du profesoriai dvidešimt trys profesoriai ... dvidešimt devyni profesoriai trisdešimt profesorių... SKAITO KNYGĄ; accusative: AŠ MATAU vieną profesorių, du profesorius, dešimt profesorių )

on those profesoriuose - ..

did approach one profesoriui - priėjau prie vieno profesoriaus

"Eleven profesoriai in one faculty, very interesting -> eleven profesorių

There are many types of vandenys - daug vandens rūšių - (could be: daug vandenų rūšių but you don't usually say: vandenys because it is a singular noun... vandenys means "waters" as in "lakes, rivers, etc.".. maybe it's no that strict as "pienas" (milk) and you could say "vandenys" though.. although it would still be unusual.. but I am not sure, it's a tricky situtation actually)

lyzazel said...

PART 3

personality of both seserų - abiejų seserų personality better

talk to your seserims a lot?" - in Lithuanian you "talk with somebody" instead "su seserimis" so it becomes tricky

but I talk to my second seseriai more. - same

I noticed a new ring on your first seseryje the othe - again this weird construction

on both my seseryse - eh

On these dukteryse - weird

I might have an idea what you mean with those "on" constructions: pas kažką yra daiktas - somone has a thing. However, first: "pas" requires an accusative, and not a locative and second: this use, I believe, is discouraged and you should say "he has a thing" instead... You use "pas" more often for things that you literally have (i.e. in your hands, in your bag, etc.).

Another thing is that you don't really need to learn that many cases... duktė could be dukteris and sesė could be seseris (we often say that) and all the forms are the same... declensions like "vanduo" have like two words too; akmuo (stone), vanduo (water), šuo (dog)... that's all I can think of. maybe dėmuo too (that's mathematical) - still not worth learning it unless you want to become a master of Lithuanian. ). Actually seseris and dukteris are the same: there are just a few words of this declension

As for the declensions, I will be trying to also teach them in my course. I believe I have made a couple of big mistakes in the course, i.e. putting verbs altogether, then nouns, etc. which makes it a lot more confusing. I should have introduced like one type of verbs then some common nouns and a few cases then some more verbs, then adverbs and again a few noun cases and expanded like that. I have also made quite a few tactical mistakes as introducing "mes" and "me" in the beginning while I didn't need to and other stuff. I was thinking on reworking the whole course but since that would take a lot of time, I will probably just end up teaching the noun cases for now all at once as I have started. I have worked up a model to teach the singular cases without too much memorization but it could and s should still be improved a lot (damn, I wish it were like a science where you find some unifying theory, such as that unifying electromagnetism and the weak force (i.e. the electroweak force) and you're done with it. I'm not sure if there are such simple patterns in Lithuanian.). I think of restructuring and partially rewriting the course sometime but I am sure how and if I will do that.

P.S. Comment posting on your website is a true pain. I wish you moved away from blogger. :)

데이빛 / Mithridates said...

Thanks for the detailed look. I assumed that the locative would come out a bit weird because it really isn't that easy to come up with a locative example for everything - horse, sister, etc.

I do remember you using a bit of weirdness on purpose though when teaching Lithuanian in your course, like in this part (Lesson 8):

>Remember, I told you that he is is jis esa? Well, I lied.

>>Lithuanian for he is is jis yra.

So I think we could probably keep a bit of weirdness in the examples as long as it helps to teach the declensions. Reducing the number of professors (to eight or so) would be easy to do, yes žmona is better than pati but apparently pati and marti are the only feminine nouns that end in -ti so there isn't much to choose from.

Also, without "to" when using arkliams it would probably be too vague for an English speaker, so there is some doubling there.

About duktė vs. dukteris, etc.: actually another good option would be for you to take these examples and pare them down a bit if you think duktė and so on are useless to learn in the beginning. You're free to take and modify the stories for your site if you like.

Hm, what about using the locative for something mental like "there was fear in the brothers"? (broliuose buvo baimė?) If you could use the locative for something like that it would make it a lot easier.

Blogger: Is it that much of a pain? It looks like this for me:

http://i.imgur.com/YI11i.png

I just type and hit "post comment".

lyzazel said...

Thanks. Well, I guess the stories are a usable as a tool on the way but what is really needed is some sort of mnemonic to unify all those cases in one. Major cases would suffice. I have come up with "the otaku ladder" but it is still not very useful yet.

Nope, "broliuose buvo baimė" does not work.
"Ji matė baimę savo broliuose." would be better (although usually it would be brolių veiduose). One could Google for example sentences (try google.lt). I have found: "Jis mums padeda atpažinti save mūsų broliuose" by doing so.

I have to select "select profile...", then "name/url" and then type it in, then I have to hit preview (nothing happens if I select Post comment) and scroll down all the way to the bottom on the next page where there is a small iframe with the preview and I have to scroll down in it and type the captcha (which is also tricky) and then hit submit. Sometimes I get a "Your request could not be processed. Please try again." error. A lot of trouble indeed. I'm using Safari on a Mac.

데이빛 / Mithridates said...

Thanks for the detailed look. I assumed that the locative would come out a bit weird because it really isn't that easy to come up with a locative example for everything - horse, sister, etc.

I do remember you using a bit of weirdness on purpose though when teaching Lithuanian in your course, like in this part (Lesson 8):

>Remember, I told you that he is is jis esa? Well, I lied.

>>Lithuanian for he is is jis yra.

So I think we could probably keep a bit of weirdness in the examples as long as it helps to teach the declensions. Reducing the number of professors (to eight or so) would be easy to do, yes žmona is better than pati but apparently pati and marti are the only feminine nouns that end in -ti so there isn't much to choose from.

Also, without "to" when using arkliams it would probably be too vague for an English speaker, so there is some doubling there.

About duktė vs. dukteris, etc.: actually another good option would be for you to take these examples and pare them down a bit if you think duktė and so on are useless to learn in the beginning. You're free to take and modify the stories for your site if you like.

Hm, what about using the locative for something mental like "there was fear in the brothers"? (broliuose buvo baimė?) If you could use the locative for something like that it would make it a lot easier.

Blogger: Is it that much of a pain? It looks like this for me:

http://i.imgur.com/YI11i.png

I just type and hit "post comment".

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