Looks like Jimmy Fallon works nights as a Lithuanian weather reporter

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Jimmy Fallon:



Jimmy Fallon giving the weather in Lithuanian. Very impressive.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Re-sellamat !

Now, by looking at the map of Europe in Lithuanian, you understand why I compare Esperanto with this language (Biaystok being near Lithuania).

Olivier

데이빛 / Mithridates said...

Yeah, I can definitely see that. Doesn't that put an end to the claim that the -o ending for place and proper names is unnatural though?

Anonymous said...

And the final drawback of this system is that it neither brings predictability. For example, "Glasgow" is "Glasgas" because the "as" turns to "o" at the genitive, but why "Bordeaux" is "Bordo" then ?

Olivier

데이빛 / Mithridates said...

No idea. Certainly they have a good reason for it though? I tend to give "natural" languages much more leeway than constructed ones; they almost always have a reason for it, or simply do it because of tradition.

By the way, why isn't the plural of cheval chevals? Chevaux is crazy talk.

Anonymous said...

Well, I suppose the change from "cheval" to "chevaux" was triggered by the reduction of the last vowel; compare: "chaud" from "calidus", thus "chevaux" from "caballos". Anyway, children often say "chevals" instead of "chevaux", and you will remain understood by saying "chevals". Worse is that there are exceptions to this rule, ex "final" = "finals", though a lot of people will say "finaux" !

I don't see here any reason for those differing exonyms in Lithuanian, since they're both loanwords (it's not like "Lenkija" = "Poland" or "Gudija" = "Belarus" !), furthermore, "Bordo" can't be declined in Lithuanian...
Ah, no language is as perfect as Sambahsa, where "Bordeaux" and "Glasgow" would be pronounced [bordOx] and [glasgOw]... I'm preparing some exercises on Sambahsa orthography.

Olivier
http://sambahsa.pbworks.com/

데이빛 / Mithridates said...

No idea. Certainly they have a good reason for it though? I tend to give "natural" languages much more leeway than constructed ones; they almost always have a reason for it, or simply do it because of tradition.

By the way, why isn't the plural of cheval chevals? Chevaux is crazy talk.

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