Latin, Interlingua and English compared: Latona et Ranae

Saturday, November 15, 2008



Here's the second translation of a simple story in Latin used for students of Latin, translated into Interlingua and English. You can see a lot more similar vocabulary in this one than the Ido version, though note that languages aren't similar merely in terms of vocabulary; a language with a single article (no indefinite article) is closer to Latin in that way. In terms of which language indirectly aids the student the most in understanding Latin though, Interlingua definitely comes out ahead. I think I'll do a Latino sine Flexione translation of this one as well.


Latin Interlingua
English
In scholā nostrā linguam Latīnam discimus. Nunc in fābulā Latīnā dē rānīs discimus.
In schola nostre nos apprende le lingua latin. Nunc in un fabula latin nos apprende super ranas.
In our school we learn Latin. Now we learn about frogs in a Latin fable.
Incolae Graeciae saepe deās vident, quod deae saepe in silvīs Graeciae ambulant. Interdum Lātōna in silvīs ambulat. Fēminae Graeciae Lātōnam, deam pulchram, amant, quod Lātōna est fēminīs benigna. Habitantes grec sovente vide deas, proque deas sovente ambula in silvas grec. Alcun vices Latona ambula in silvas. Feminas grec ama Latona, le dea belle, proque Latona es amabile (benigne) a feminas.
Greek inhabitants often see goddesses, because goddesses often walk in Greek forests. Sometimes Latona walks in forests. Greek women love Latona, the beautiful goddess, because Latona is kind to women.
Nunc Lātōna in silvā ambulat. Cum Lātōnā sunt īnfantēs Diāna et Apollō.Nunc Latona ambula in le silva. Con Latona es le infantes Diana e Apollo.
Now Latona walks in the forest. With Latona are the infants Diana and Apollo.
Agricolae Látōnam et īnfantēs spectant; deam timent. Dea agricolās videt; itaque agricolās vocat. Aquam ōrat. Lātōna aquam nōn dēsīderat; sed īnfantēs aquam dēsīderant.Agricultores vide Latona e le infantes; illes time le dea. Le dea vide le agricultores; dunque illa advoca le agricultores. Illa demanda aqua. Illa non desira aqua; sed le infantes desira aqua.
Farmers see Latona and the infants; they fear the goddess. The goddess sees the farmers; therefore she calls the farmers. She asks for water. Latona doesn't want the water; but the infants want the water.
Est aqua in lacūnā, sed agricolae Lātōnae aquam dare nōn dēsīderant. Itaque in lacūnā ambulant; nunc aqua nōn est bona. Lātōna est īrāta quod agricolae sunt in aquā.Es aqua in le laco, sed le agricultores non desira dar le aqua a Latona. Dunque illes ambula in le laco; nunc le aqua non est bon. Latona es irate proque le agricultores es in le aqua.
There is water in the lake, but the farmers don't want to give the water to Latona. Therefore they walk in the lake; now the water is not good. Latona is angry because the farmers are in the water.
Dea īrāta clāmat.Le dea irate crita.
The angry goddess shouts.
Nunc agricolae sunt rānae. Nunc agricolae in casīs nōn habitant; in lacūnā habitant, quod sunt rānae.Nunc le agricultores es ranas. Nunc le agricultores non habita in casas; illes habita in le laco, proque illes es ranas.
Now the farmers are frogs. Now the farmers do not live in houses; they live in the lake, because they are frogs.

2 comments:

esef said...

Your example shows very well the power of Interlingua - with pleasure I'am looking forward tho the Lexione sine Flexione version.

esef said...

Your example shows very well the power of Interlingua - with pleasure I'am looking forward tho the Lexione sine Flexione version.

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